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SOAP Tutorials

  • Essential XML/SOAP with Don Box: Interview with Don Box (42 minute audio/video in MP3 format)
    In the first installment in a series of interviews that explore the technical foundations of Microsoft's .NET strategy, Don Box discusses the convergence of traditional object models and the web.
    DON'T MISS THIS!


  • Simplified SOAP Development with SOAP::Lite - Part I
    As of September 2001, there are around seventy (70) toolkits available from various sources including Microsoft, Apache, Cape Clear, and so on, to aid develop SOAP client and/or server applications. The question is which one should you use? The answer is – it depends! If you are used to Microsoft technologies, you may go with Microsoft SOAP Toolkit or .NET Framework SDK, depending on which platform you are developing on; however if you like the "tim-toady" way of programming, the best bet for you would be to use SOAP::Lite for Perl, developed by Paul Kulchenko.

    In this article series, we'll take a detailed look at SOAP::Lite, a wonderful SOAP Toolkit, and understand how it simplifies the SOAP development process. This first installment introduces Perl and discusses how to write SOAP clients using the SOAP::Lite toolkit.
    Learn more >>


  • Quick Start with SOAP
    In this article, Paul Kulchenko uses SOAP::Lite module from CPAN and shows how SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) is a way for you to remotely make method calls upon classes and objects that exist on a remote server.


  • SOAP Specification
    SOAP is a lightweight protocol for exchange of information in a decentralized, distributed environment. It is an XML based protocol that consists of three parts: an envelope that defines a framework for describing what is in a message and how to process it, a set of encoding rules for expressing instances of application-defined datatypes, and a convention for representing remote procedure calls and responses. SOAP can potentially be used in combination with a variety of other protocols; however, the only bindings defined in this document describe how to use SOAP in combination with HTTP and HTTP Extension Framework.


  • Distributed Computing With SOAP
    Learn how and why SOAP fits into the big picture of today's distributed computing arena. Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) was born into distributed computing technology about 18 months ago as the brainchild of a few developers and researchers at DevelopMentor and Microsoft. They created SOAP to ...


  • The MSDN Show: Using SOAP
    SOAP stands for Simple Object Access Protocol, and represents the underlying structure of how applications can expose their interfaces across the Internet. Microsoft's .NET Platform relies on SOAP to provide application connectivity to virtually any type of computer system and be able to easily allow solutions to be built upon a distributed heterogeneous network.

    In this episode, Dave Reed and Andrew Layman talk about how SOAP is incorporated within the .NET Platform, and how it was designed to be an efficient solution for distributed and discoverable interfaces and services. Later Keith Ballinger, who will show us how easy it is to use the .NET Framework to provide SOAP interfaces for the applications that we are writing.


  • XML as a basis for remote procedure calls
    Inter-object communication requires that one object can locate another object, notify that object that it would like to use its services, and receive a response. The information exchanged between the objects needs to be placed in a suitable format that can be understood by both and also travel over the wire.


  • Getting Started with XML-RPC in Perl, Part 1: Using XML-RPC for Web services
    Creating an XML-RPC Web service with Perl is almost as easy as CGI scripting. This article will bring you up to speed on what XML-RPC is and how to use Perl's Frontier::RPC library to create simple clients and servers.


  • Create Firewall-Friendly Distributed Apps
    The Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) promises nothing less than to change how you architect, implement, and deploy VB applications—today. At the same time, SOAP—as it stands now—has some significant limitations, not the least of which is performance. Understanding what SOAP is and what it can do for you—as well as what it can't—is the key to using it effectively.


  • Understanding SOAP
    Soap is merely a wire protocol; however, it offers many advantages over other protocols. This includes scalability, performance, activation, state management, garbage collection, and security.


  • How SOAP Works
    This article provides an explanation of how SOAP works, including information about its on-the-wire protocol and how messages are processed. It also explains how objects can be passed by value between Web services, and touches on performance and security issues.


  • A Young Person's Guide to The SOAP
    The Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) facilitates interoperability among a wide range of programs and platforms, making existing applications accessible to a broader range of users. SOAP combines the proven Web tech­no­logy of HTTP with the flexibility and extensibility of XML. This article takes you on a comprehensive tour of Object RPC technology to help you understand the foundations of SOAP and the ways it overcomes many of the limitations of existing technologies, including DCOM and CORBA. This is followed by a detailed treatment of the SOAP encoding rules with a focus on how SOAP maps onto existing ORPC concepts.


  • SOAP: Simple Object Access Protocol
    A nice article on SOAP from TechMetrix Research.


  • SOAP in the Microsoft .NET Framework and Visual Studio.NET
    The Microsoft® .NET Framework and Microsoft® Visual Studio.NET take advantage of XML and SOAP technologies to allow developers to create solutions with reach. SOAP is a simple and lightweight protocol with wide industry support. It is useful and usable for a wide variety of applications. SOAP and the .NET Frameworks are an easy and natural fit.


  • Catch Some SOAP - Building The Business Logic Backbone of the Internet
    The search for the next killer technology. In recent years, the IT industry has been flooded with marketing buzz about the next generation killer applications and technologies that were supposed to rule the future of the information technology world and could rival the massive impact of the last real killer couple: HTML & HTTP.


  • SOAP And Firewalls
    In just the last five years, accessing information via the Internet has become an essential requirement of the modern world. By far the most common protocol used to accomplish this today is the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). Supported by every browser and Web server, it's an effective technology for transferring text, graphics, and other information.


  • Inside SOAP
    An Article by Don Box on XML.com
    The Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) is a minimal set of conventions for invoking code using XML and HTTP. DevelopMentor, Microsoft, and UserLand Software submitted SOAP to the IETF as an Internet Draft in December 1999.


  • SOAP: The Simple Object Access Protocol
    Remote objects can give a program almost unlimited power over the Internet, but most firewalls block non-HTTP requests. SOAP, an XML-based protocol, gets around this limitation to provide intraprocess communication across machines.


  • The Programmable Web
    The Programmable Web: Web Services Provides Building Blocks for the Microsoft .NET Framework: Web Services are building blocks for constructing distributed Web-based applications in a platform, object model, and multilanguage manner. Web Services are based on open Internet standards, such as HTTP and XML, and form the basis of Microsoft's vision of the programmable Web. This article defines Web Services and the key enabling technologies that ensure services can be aggregated into applications. It then describes Microsoft's new Microsoft .NET Framework and its support for creating and consuming Web Services.


  • SOAP, the Simple Object Access Protocol
    The Programmable Web: Web Services Provides Building Blocks for the Microsoft .NET Framework: Web Services are building blocks for constructing distributed Web-based applications in a platform, object model, and multilanguage manner. Web Services are based on open Internet standards, such as HTTP and XML, and form the basis of Microsoft's vision of the programmable Web. This article defines Web Services and the key enabling technologies that ensure services can be aggregated into applications. It then describes Microsoft's new Microsoft .NET Framework and its support for creating and consuming Web Services.


  • Soapbox: Why I'm using SOAP: One developer tells why he's feeling sold on SOAP
    In the XML zone's new opinion department, Benoît Marchal steps up on the soapbox to tell why SOAP is winning him over. SOAP's selling point is its simplicity, Marchal says. Because the new protocol builds on familiar technologies, in particular the Web server and XML, it's relatively easy for developers to design and deploy SOAP servers.


  • What the heck is SOAP, anyway?
    A small article by David S. Platt


  • Using SOAP
    The Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) is a hot topic these days. The technology itself is simple, as shown by Sander Duivestein in this article. But the implications of its use are very exciting. It means that you'll be able to use objects and call methods located on other machines on the Internet. It doesn't matter what language they were written in nor what platform they're running on. SOAP solves all of those problems in one stroke!


  • Web Services Description Language (WSDL) 1.0
    WSDL is an XML format for describing network services as a set of endpoints operating on messages containing either document-oriented or procedure-oriented information. The operations and messages are described abstractly, and then bound to a concrete network protocol and message format to define an endpoint. Related concrete endpoints are combined into abstract endpoints (services). WSDL is extensible to allow description of endpoints and their messages regardless of what message formats or network protocols are used to communicate, however, the only bindings described in this document describe how to use WSDL in conjunction with SOAP 1.1, HTTP GET/POST, and MIME.


  • Implementing SOAP with Java
    The Simple Object Access Protocol has a lot to offer coders working with Java and XML — particularly remote procedure calls.


  • SOAP: Platform-Independent Server Communication
    You know the scenario, you need to somehow get data from your server to your customer's server and this needs to be implemented tomorrow. No problem, let's write a VB Com object that will create a constant link to the customer's server through Port 1452 and anytime our database is updated it will transmit the data across! No, wait. There's no way I can implement that by tomorrow. Plus, opening that port on our firewall will completely invalidate our network security guidelines. Ok, We can just send them weekly backups! Yeah, right.


  • SOAP Primer
    Entry from Develop.com SOAP newsgroup


  • Anatomy of a SOAP Client
    Piroz Mohseni presents the typical steps a client application must take in order to invoke a SOAP call.
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